Book Review: Written in the Stars by Alexandria Bellefleur – A Pride and Prejudice Inspired F/F Love Story

Blurb:

With nods to Bridget Jones and Pride and Prejudice, a charming #ownvoices queer rom-com debut about a free-spirited social media astrologer who agrees to fake a relationship with an uptight actuary until New Year’s Eve—with results not even the stars could predict!

After a disastrous blind date, Darcy Lowell is desperate to stop her well-meaning brother from playing matchmaker ever again. Love—and the inevitable heartbreak—is the last thing she wants. So she fibs and says her latest set up was a success. Darcy doesn’t expect her lie to bite her in the ass.

Elle Jones, one of the astrologers behind the popular Twitter account, Oh My Stars, dreams of finding her soul mate. But she knows it is most assuredly not Darcy… a no-nonsense stick-in-the-mud, who is way too analytical, punctual, and skeptical for someone as free-spirited as Elle. When Darcy’s brother—and Elle’s new business partner—expresses how happy he is that they hit it off, Elle is baffled. Was Darcy on the same date? Because… awkward.

When Darcy begs Elle to play along, she agrees to pretend they’re dating to save face. But with a few conditions: Darcy must help Elle navigate her own overbearing family over the holidays and their arrangement expires on New Year’s Eve. The last thing they expect is to develop real feelings during a fake relationship.

But maybe opposites can attract when true love is written in the stars?

Written in the Stars is one of my favorite F/F romances. Like the blurb says, it has nods to Pride and Prejudice in our the protagonists’ namesakes, their family structure, and most importantly, their relationship dynamic. I will always have a soft spot for anything Pride and Prejudice inspired because it was the first book after elementary school that made me fall in love with reading in AP English.

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Our Friend is Here! Latinx Heritage Month – An Interview with Adri, the Booktuber Behind perpetualpages; On The Evolution of Booktube, Queer Sports Books, and Celebrating Latinx Lit

lhm adri

Our Friend is Hereis a guest feature at The Quiet Pond, where authors, creatives, and fellow readers, are invited to ‘visit’ the Pond! In Our Friend is Here! guest posts, our visitors (as their very own unique character!) have a friendly conversation about anything related to books or being a reader — and become friends with Xiaolong and friends.

Our Friend is Here: Latinx Heritage Month Edition is a month-long event at The Quiet Pond, where between September 15th and October 15th, Latinx authors and bookish content creators are invited to celebrate being Latinx and Latinx books. Find the introduction post for Latinx Heritage Month at The Quiet Pond here.

Adri is one of my favorite Booktubers. They have introduced me to so many books that are not frequently seen on Booktube, and new thoughts and insights on books that appear more often. I have especially appreciated their recommendations of Ownvoices queer and Latinx books, and queer sports contemporary books (!!!).

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Our Friend is Here! Latinx Heritage Month – An Interview with Romina Garber, Author of Lobizona; On Argentinian Folklore, Nuances of Ownvoices, and Experiences of Undocumented Immigrants

lhm romina garber

Our Friend is Hereis a guest feature at The Quiet Pond, where authors, creatives, and fellow readers, are invited to ‘visit’ the Pond! In Our Friend is Here! guest posts, our visitors (as their very own unique character!) have a friendly conversation about anything related to books or being a reader — and become friends with Xiaolong and friends.

Our Friend is Here: Latinx Heritage MonthEditionis a month-long event at The Quiet Pond, where between September 15th and October 15th, Latinx authors and bookish content creators are invited to celebrate being Latinx and Latinx books. Find the introduction post for Latinx Heritage Month at The Quiet Pond here.

2020 has certainly been a year. In some ways, the occurrences have been moreso a set of consequences that we are enduring for a lack of government response to requests for systemic change and response to climate change, and less happenstance. It almost feels like an alternate reality, and here is when many readers turn to fantasy novels and stories to instill and explore ideas of hope, strategy, and compassion to continue fighting and moving forward. Lobizona by Romina Garber is by far one of my favorite books of 2020 for this reason. It is a mirror to the realities of our current world in a fantasy setting.

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[Blog Tour] Five Reasons to Read: Where Dreams Descend by Janella Angeles – A Tale of Redemption, Fighting Gender Discrimination, and a Magicians’ Competition

book review where dreams descend janella angeles
Blurb:

In a city covered in ice and ruin, a group of magicians face off in a daring game of magical feats to find the next headliner of the Conquering Circus, only to find themselves under the threat of an unseen danger striking behind the scenes.

As each act becomes more and more risky and the number of missing magicians piles up, three are forced to reckon with their secrets before the darkness comes for them next.

The Star: Kallia, a powerful showgirl out to prove she’s the best no matter the cost

The Master: Jack, the enigmatic keeper of the club, and more than one lie told

The Magician: Demarco, the brooding judge with a dark past he can no longer hide

Where Dreams Descend is the startling and romantic first book in Janella Angeles’ debut Kingdom of Cards fantasy duology where magic is both celebrated and feared, and no heart is left unscathed.

Blog Tour Banner_Use before 8.25
Joce’s Review:

Where Dreams Descend is pitched as Phantom of the Opera meets Moulin Rouge, and as an avid figure skating fan, I am extremely familiar with and have developed an ardent love for both (and their soundtracks!). I fully agree with and endorse these comparisons, as we have a lively and complex cast of characters, a plot and world surrounding performance arts, magicians, and moody boys.

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Book Review: Almost American Girl by Robin Ha – A Graphic Memoir about Immigration, Strict Gender Norms, and Forging Friendships Through Comics and Art

almost american girl robin ha book review the quiet pond

Blurb:

For as long as she can remember, it’s been Robin and her mom against the world. Growing up as the only child of a single mother in Seoul, Korea, wasn’t always easy, but it has bonded them fiercely together.

So when a vacation to visit friends in Huntsville, Alabama, unexpectedly becomes a permanent relocation—following her mother’s announcement that she’s getting married—Robin is devastated.

Overnight, her life changes. She is dropped into a new school where she doesn’t understand the language and struggles to keep up. She is completely cut off from her friends in Seoul and has no access to her beloved comics. At home, she doesn’t fit in with her new stepfamily, and worst of all, she is furious with the one person she is closest to—her mother.

Then one day Robin’s mother enrolls her in a local comic drawing class, which opens the window to a future Robin could never have imagined.

Joce’s review:

Almost American Girl provides an intimate look at the author’s journey through immigrating from South Korea to Huntsville, Alabama, in the USA, very suddenly after her mother tells her she has met a man and is going to marry him. Robin Ha invites the readers into her adolescence through this graphic memoir which allows them to see such a full range of emotions: anger towards her mother, anxiety at attending school, sorrow and intense frustration at trying to fit in when she doesn’t understand her peers and is bullied, and a flood of relief when she finds a first glimmer of connection during her comics drawing class.

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