Front Desk by Kelly Yang – A Compassionate & Empowering Story About The Immigrant Experience, Poverty, and Community

Front Desk [by Kelly Yang]

Blurb:

Mia Tang has a lot of secrets.

Number 1: She lives in a motel, not a big house. Every day, while her immigrant parents clean the rooms, ten-year-old Mia manages the front desk of the Calivista Motel and tends to its guests.

Number 2: Her parents hide immigrants. And if the mean motel owner, Mr. Yao, finds out they’ve been letting them stay in the empty rooms for free, the Tangs will be doomed.

Number 3: She wants to be a writer. But how can she when her mom thinks she should stick to math because English is not her first language?

It will take all of Mia’s courage, kindness, and hard work to get through this year. Will she be able to hold on to her job, help the immigrants and guests, escape Mr. Yao, and go for her dreams?

CW’s review:

A few pages into Front Desk by Kelly Yang, I thought to myself, I’m falling in love with this book. Unsurprisingly, Front Desk became not only one of my effortless favourites back in 2018, but it became one of my favourite books ever – more than deserving, I felt, to be in my ‘forever in my heart’ shelf in Goodreads. Front Desk may be a middle-grade novel, but don’t be fooled – it has a light and compassionate narrative but also delves into tough topics that children and adults alike can learn from.

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Magic Ramen: The Story of Momofuku Ando by Andrea Wang – A Wonderful Picture Book About The Inventor of Instant Ramen

Text: Magic Ramen, The Story of Momofuku Ando; Written by Andrea Wang, illustrated by Kana Urbanowicz. Image: An illustration of Momofuku Ando holding up a massive bowl of ramen, with the title of the book in the bowl of ramen.
Blurb:

Inspiration struck when Momofuku Ando spotted the long lines for a simple bowl of ramen following World War II. Magic Ramen tells the true story behind the creation of one of the world’s most popular foods.

Every day, Momofuku Ando would retire to his lab–a little shed in his backyard. For years, he’d dreamed about making a new kind of ramen noodle soup that was quick, convenient, and tasty for the hungry people he’d seen in line for a bowl on the black market following World War II. Peace follows from a full stomach,he believed.

Day after day, Ando experimented. Night after night, he failed. But Ando kept experimenting.

CW’s review:

I received a copy of this book from the author. This does not affect the contents of my review and all opinions are my own.

When I discovered this book whilst looking for books to read for the Year of the Asian Reading Challenge, I was absolutely delighted to discover Magic Ramen, a picture book about the inventor of instant ramen, Momofuku Ando. To be honest, before discovering this gorgeous picture book, I was completely ignorant of the history, and so reading this autobiographical picture book and learning about the history of instant ramen was such a delightful experience.

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BLOG TOUR: The Weight Of Our Sky by Hanna Alkaf – A Malay Teen Searches For Her Mother During the Malaysian 1969 Riots (Book Review & Author Interview)

White block reads 'The Weight of Our Sky, Hanna Alkaf, South-east Asian Blog Tour. January 28th - February 8th 2019. On the right is an image of a Malay female teen wearing a blue pinafore over a white tshirt on a moped, driven by a Chinese male teen wearing a white shirt and black slacks, with fire and smoke in the background.

“Friend, friend, friend!”

Xiaolong scurries to you, a bounce in her step and a big smile on her face. “I have some wonderful plans for your visit today!”

You crouch down so you can see her better, and ask her about her plans.

Xiaolong the pink axolotl, wearing an upside down flower hat, holding a staff and gesturing to a floating book, The Weight of Our Sky by Hanna Alkaf.

“Okay, first!” She raises her staff, magicks a book from midair, and gestures to the book. “This book! It only just released, friend! And it’s such a good book. I couldn’t put it down! I just wanted to keep reading and reading and reading, and then, when I finished it, Gen told me that it was time for dinner.” She shakes her head. “I also learned a lot, friend. I had no idea about the historical events that this book talks about, and I… I learned a lot. And I think it’s really important that I tell you about this book.”

Once you find a comfier spot by the Pond, you settle down and ask Xiaolong about this important book.

“So,” she says, holding the cover out for you to see. “This book is called The Weight of Our Sky…

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The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid – Well, I Cried My Eyes Out Reading This

“Where’s Xiaolong?” you ask, looking for your little axolotl friend.

Varian the Toadshifter looks up at you from their sewing. “Ah, Xiaolong is very sad today.” You ask why, wondering what in the world could make Xiaolong, usually so chipper and happy, so sad! “She read a book,” is all Varian says, and they point in the direction of the pond.

You follow Varian’s webbed finger and, indeed, you see the bright pink of Xiaolong’s gills poking out from behind the brush. As you approach, you hear her sniffling and hiccuping.

Xiaolong the axolotl, wearing an upside down flower hat, holding a book to her chest and crying loudly.Xiaolong looks up at you when you approach, her eyes glistening with tears and her eyes puffy. “Hello friend,” she says, her gills a little droopy. “I just read such an amazing book.” You ask her why she is crying. “The best books are the ones that move your heart and this one moved mine so much.” She starts sobbing again.

“Maybe I should come back another time?” you ask, not wanting to invade her space.

“No!” she exclaims even louder, jumping to her feet. “I must tell you about this book! Because I think you will love it!” she says, tears streaming down her face. You ask her about the book and hand her some tissues – just in case. She takes the tissues from you, dabs her eyes, and with a big inhale says, “So, this book is called The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo…

Summary:

Evelyn Hugo is finally ready to tell the truth about her glamorous and scandalous life. But when she chooses unknown magazine reporter Monique Grant for the job, no one in the journalism community is more astounded than Monique herself. Why her? Why now?

Monique is not exactly on top of the world. Her husband, David, has left her, and her career has stagnated. Regardless of why Evelyn has chosen her to write her biography, Monique is determined to use this opportunity to jumpstart her career.

Summoned to Evelyn’s Upper East Side apartment, Monique listens as Evelyn unfurls her story: from making her way to Los Angeles in the 1950s to her decision to leave show business in the late 80s, and, of course, the seven husbands along the way. As Evelyn’s life unfolds through the decades—revealing a ruthless ambition, an unexpected friendship, and a great forbidden love—Monique begins to feel a very a real connection to the actress. But as Evelyn’s story catches up with the present, it becomes clear that her life intersects with Monique’s own in tragic and irreversible ways.

My review:

Whilst Reid’s previous books explored the lives of ordinary everyday women and the mundane but significant turning points in their lives, The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo dives into the extraordinary, grand, and tumultuous life of infamous bombshell classic actress, Evelyn Hugo. The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo was significantly different to her other books, but what I did not expect was that I would come to love The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo so, so much. The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo is Reid’s best book yet.

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